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nbGazette.ca Black Bloc Anarchist exposed as G20 Toronto Police Agent Provocateurs. Anarchists not our sworn servants and protectors. «


45 seconds into this video footage you can clearly see Black Bloc Anarchist dressed people running towards the police line and allowed through. Throughout the 2 day Toronto G20 Summit, it is become increasingly clear that the ‘Black Bloc’ are undercover police operatives engaged in purposeful provocations to eclipse and invalidate legitimate G20 citizen protest by starting a riot. Police “allowed” the trashing of their purposely abandoned police cruisers in order to create what will become the signature media images of the event - burning police cars in Toronto.

In the above video and any number of other G20 videos you can see that a large number of supposed police officers are breaking long standing laws. All officers must verbally identify themselves as police officers and show police identification whenever they make an arrest. All police officers must carry a police badge which identifies them as a police officer and has their employee number. They must also carry a warrant card which has their photograph. Hundreds of people were unlawfully arrested because the arresting officers in the majority of arrests were dressed in plain clothes and simply, violently, snatched people from the peaceful crowds of protesters without verbally identifying themselves or showing a badge.

There are a number of videos on the Internet that shows minivans driving into a peaceful protest scene and a number of men jump out and literally kidnap protesters. The vans have no marking whatsoever that would identify it as a police vehicle and the men jumping out and grabbing people have no visible identifying credentials that would even remotely suggest that they are police officers. If these are suppose to be arrests the law requires the arresting officer to identify themselves verbally and visually and to immediately advise the suspect of the reason for his or her arrest and immediately advise the arrested person of their legal rights.

Virtually all individuals who are arbitrarily arrested are given absolutely no explanation as to why they are being arrested, and they are not shown any arrest warrant. Arbitrarily depriving an individual of their liberty is strictly prohibited by the United Nations’ division for human rights. Article 55 of the 2002 Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court declares such a practice by government a major crime.

Articles 9 and 11 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights:

Article 9
1. Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest or detention. No one shall be deprived of his liberty except on such grounds and in accordance with such procedure as are established by law.
2. Anyone who is arrested shall be informed, at the time of arrest, of the reasons for his arrest and shall be promptly informed of any charges against him.
4. Anyone who is deprived of his liberty by arrest or detention shall be entitled to take proceedings before a court, in order that that court may decide without delay on the lawfulness of his detention and order his release if the detention is not lawful.
5. Anyone who has been the victim of unlawful arrest or detention shall have an enforceable right to compensation.

CANADIAN CHARTER OF RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS

2. Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms:
(a) freedom of conscience and religion;
(b) freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication;
(c) freedom of peaceful assembly; and
(d) freedom of association.

10. Everyone has the right on arrest or detention
(a) to be informed promptly of the reasons therefor;
(b) to retain and instruct counsel without delay and to be informed of that right; and
(c) to have the validity of the detention determined by way of habeas corpus and to be released if the detention is not lawful.

Canadian-abuse.jpg
A video you have to see of Cops Charging Protesters at Queen and Spadina, After “O Canada”

The G20 Toronto Summit has now become the most expensive 72 hours in Canadian history. The cost of securing the Metro Toronto Convention Centre and the surrounding area for the 72 hour G20 Toronto summit now sit at approximately $1.2 billion. Public Safety Minister Vic Toews defended the costs for security, saying Canada has an obligation to make sure world leaders are safe while visiting Toronto and Huntsville, Ont.

serveandprotect.jpg

If that were true then why hasn’t Canada’s most important figurehead, the Queen, been afforded the same security considerations as the G20 leaders and bankers received? Today is Canada Day and Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh are in Ottawa on an official state visit to partake in the celebration of Canada’s birthday. Nowhere can be seen any police in full riot gear pushing and clubbing the assembled people even though there are thousands of Canadians participating in the celebrations with Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh. It was announced that the Queen would do a walkabout among the thousands of Canadian celebrants. We don’t see any police in full riot gear rushing to protect our and their Queen and we don’t see people becoming violent even though this is a much larger peaceful assembly of people than what the G20 saw or could ever hope to see. The Queen is more important than any foreign dignitary or banker and yet the Toronto Police and its 8,000+ members acted as though their allegiance were to the US president and other foreign dignitaries when in fact their first and foremost allegiance is to the people, as represented by the Queen. The Toronto Police Service Motto “To Serve and Protect” is displayed for all to see on their patrol cars. Who do they serve and protect was clearly evident June 26 and 27 at the G20 Summit.

Queen Elizabeth told 100,000 people on Parliament Hill on Thursday that she could think of no better reason to celebrate than Canada’s 143rd birthday.

Queen Elizabeth II arrived on Parliament Hill in a horse drawn carriage. She was dressed in Canada Day red and, after watching an array of musical acts — both French and English — the Queen of Canada wished her country a happy birthday in French and English. Below, a transcript of what she said.

“Prime Minister, Minister, distinguished guests, fellow Canadians. Today, all across this country, Canadians are coming together to celebrate the history of Canada, its identity and its achievements.

In my opinion there is no better reason to celebrate. Thank you for inviting Prince Philip and me to join you on this special day.

During my lifetime, I have been a witness to this country for more than half its history since Confederation. I have watched with enormous admiration how Canada has grown and matured while remaining true to its history, its distinctive character, and its values.

This nation has dedicated itself to being a caring home for its own, a sanctuary for others and an example for the world. We have just now seen images of the Canadian forces [on a giant screen], and diplomats and humanitarian workers at work across the globe providing their support and assistance to others in dangerous and hostile circumstances, and earning the respect of us all.

The Canadian Oath of Allegiance is a promise or declaration of fealty to the Canadian monarch, taken, along with other specific oaths of office, by new occupants of various government positions, including federal and provincial viceroys, appointees to the Queen’s Privy Council, Supreme Court justices, members of the federal and provincial parliaments, as well as of the Canadian Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The Oath of Allegiance also makes up the first portion of the Oath of Citizenship, and may form a part of oaths taken by new members of provincial and municipal police forces.

I, [name], do Solemnly swear (affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Canada, Her Heirs and Successors according to law, forever. So help me God

The Oath of Allegiance was implemented to secure the supremacy of the reigning monarch of Canada, the giving of faithfulness to whom is a manifestation of a key responsibility central to the Canadian system of government, and serves to “remind individuals taking it of the serious obligations and responsibilities that he or she is assuming.”

Former Premier of Ontario Mike Harris said in 1993: “The oath to the Queen is fundamental to the administration of the law in this country. It signifies that, here in Canada, justice is done — not in the name of the Prime Minister, or the Mayor, or the Police Chief, as in totalitarian nations — but by the people, in the name of the Queen,

The following Law Enforcement Oath of Honor is recommended as by the International Association of Chiefs of Police as symbolic statement of commitment to ethical behavior:

On my honor,
I will never betray my badge,
my integrity, my character,
or the public trust.
I will always have
the courage to hold myself
and others accountable for our actions.
I will always uphold the constitution
my community and the agency I serve.

Before any officer takes the Law Enforcement Oath of Honor, it is important that he/she understands what it means. An oath is a solemn pledge someone makes when he/she sincerely intends to do what he/she says.

Honor means that one’s word is given as a guarantee.
Betray is defined as breaking faith with the public trust.
Badge is the symbol of your office.
Integrity is being the same person in both private and public life.
Character means the qualities that distinguish an individual.
Public trust is a charge of duty imposed in faith toward those you serve.
Courage is having the strength to withstand unethical pressure, fear or danger.
Accountability means that you are answerable and responsible to your oath of office.
Community is the jurisdiction and citizens served.

POLICE SURROUND PEACEFUL PROTESTERS AND ATTACK - QUEENS PARK TORONTO - G20


In what has become for many in Toronto—and around the world—the iconic moments of the G20 weekend, police charging into an apparently peaceful crowd.

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